Tuesday 25 June 2024

Submitted palindromes: RANDOM PILES 39


GREETINGS, WORDPLAY ENTHUSIASTS !!!
  
You have reached the "Submitted Palindromes" thread on the blog "Edifying Nonsense", a light literary entity that emanates through the blogosphere 5 times per month.

  On the 25th of each month you can find a slide-filling group of palindromic phrases submitted to the editors by a panel of 7 palindromists. These folks have all been working on this project since January 2020. Their profiles are indicated in panels published here at the start of things, and periodically (about every eight 'issues'), we ask them to provide, palindromically, of course, their views on one of the iconic items in the classic literature, starting with "A man, a plan, a canal -- Panama", and continuing with other well-known phrases, such as "Dennis sinned". Otherwise, their contribution are grouped in random piles (a phrase that you might recognize as an anagram of the word p-a-l-i-n-d-r-o-m-e-s). Contribution by others, such as you, will likely be published, although we are still awaiting a trickle of requests.

  You can find these back-and-forth enlightenments, as well as a lot of other stuff that appeals to word-nerds, in the contents listed by date in the right-hand column of the blog-page. By the way, the twentieth of each month is devoted to a major article on wordplay (starting with a didactic series in 2020 on "political palindromes"); and the posts on the 5th, 10th and 15th to collections of terse and mirthful verse (limericks and "limerrhoids"), that are often targeted at wordplay.
HAVE FUN! 

   As a web-traveller, you might have landed here while roaming from a starting point on the blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense" (a repository of verse, parody-song-lyrics and related photos, as well as wordplay)If you wish to return, click the link. 





Editors' Note: 
We have discouraged our submitters in general from presenting palindromic phrases in these collections based primarily on geographic place-names. But, we recognize that many wordplay enthusiasts are keen to review geo-palindromes specifically (such as those about various canals). To view our large collection of such intriguing wordplay displayed on maps of the Americas, or the Old World", click HERE to get started, and just follow the links at the bottom of each post.  

Thursday 20 June 2024

The CULINARY WORLD Explored through PALINDROMES


Discussion with Examples
GUEST EDITORS: Sarah Palindrome and Melonia, December, 2016. Contributions are a mix of phrases drawn from standard lists and those concocted by the guest editors. 


The CULINARY WORLD Explored through PALINDROMES 

GENERAL PRINCIPLES, SHOPPING etc.
Do often net food.
Marché, eh? Cram. [Fr. = market or market-place]
Nip in if I nip in.
a) Sup U.S. [locovores' motto?] b) Sup CCCP/U.S. [abbrev. in Cyrillic script, Soviet Union]
Yreka Bakery.
One man, a palate et al. - a panameño. [Sp. - citizen of Panama]
Smug gums.

VEGETABLES
Ail, a dive - vidalia. [type of sweet onion, named for the town of Vidalia GA]
A.m. rapini - Parma.
A man, a potato - Panama.
Evil, O evil - live olive.
May a moody baby doom a yam?
No 'I'; No 'O'; - onion.
O, had I a tip: acre potato per capita: Idaho.
O, nag eros -- oregano.
Onion, ah? Hanoi, no.
Plan okra; park on Alp.
Sir, a potato? - Paris.
To potato pot!
Sugar, a psalm - (L.) asparagus. [L. = Latin derivation]


FRUITS
A man, apple; yelp, "Panama".
A melon? Olé, Ma.
Ana, nab a banana.
Apple? Help, Pa.
Émil, asleep, peels a lime.
Émil: a sleepy baby peels a lime.
Émil? No! Mel, asleep, peels a lemon-lime.
Gift fig.
Lemon? No, Mel.
No! It's a banana bastion.
No 'lem'n' in melon.
No 'melon' in "O, lemon"
No M. misreps 'persimmon'.[M. = Fr. abbrev. for monsieur]
No. Mel, awash, saw a lemon.
No melt-lemon.
No, Milton, not limón. [Sp. = lemon]
Nome lemon.
No R. tick - citron.

Not a banana baton?
No way a papaya won!
O, Gus. No lemon. No melon sugo.[sugo = It. for sauce or juice] Stun nuts.

FISH/SEAFOOD
A man, a pan, olé! crab -- Barcelona (Panama).
A nut for a jar of tuna.
Bar clears - Israel, crab.
Doc: Note, I dissent. A fatness - I diet on cod.
Draw eels leeward.
Mahi-mahi. I ham. I ham.
No 'm' lasts. Old lost salmon.
No romp. Race carp, moron.
Tuna roll or a nut.

MEAT
A ham - Omaha.
A man, a plate, ewe et al. -- Panama.
A man, a plate, elk-cub, buckle et al. -- Panama.
A Santa puréed deer up at NASA.
Feeble, very. Revel? Beef.
I'm, alas, a salami.
Ma has a ham.
One man, a pollo panameño.
Re grub: Ma had a hamburger.

SEASONING, SPICES, and OILS
Dill, a plan, a canal -- pallid.
Drat! "Sumatra Art", a mustard.
Lisa Bonet ate no basil.
Oil: olio. [It. = oil]
One pal, a jar, a jalapeño.
Ragù -- sugar.
"Salt", an atlas.
Le sel. [Fr. = salt]

BREAD AND BAKED GOODS
I, not ten aprons nor panettoni.
Leg -- a banana bagel.
O, had I a tip -- pita; Idaho.
Sniff'um muffins.
Snub buns.
Naan. [an Indian bread]

APPETIZERS AND MEALS
On, I nap -- panino
A man, a panino, O Nina -- Panama.
A man, a pâté, feta -- Panama.
A man, a pasta, amore -- Roma ('ats-a Panama).
Eh, canapé -- panache.
Go hang a salami, I'm a lasagna hog.
I, not a girl -- rigatoni.
Lit' Nel, on dahl had no lentil.
Salad, alas.
Stir grits.
Sewer of wet stew for ewes.
Wontons? Not now.
Yo, Bob. Mug a' gumbo, boy!

BEVERAGES
Decaf level-faced.
Emily's sassy lime.
Évian: naïve [French brand of bottled water]
No gong! Get up. Put eggnog on!
Nary a demand named 'ayran'.[Turkish = a popular, yogurt-based drink]
No cider. Red icon.
Red ice cider.
Tunis -- Pepsi nut.

WINE, BEER, LIQUOR etc.
Alas Ramón, no marsala!
Amen: a pinot, nom de 'Edmonton' (Ipanema).
Lager, sir, is regal.
Murder for a jar of red rum.
Night: fifth gin.
"Rum... rum...", I murmur.
No bar? Got no rot? Toronto, grab ON.
Campus motto: Bottom's up, Mac.

DESSERTS
A cakery? Yreka, CA.
A flan, a final plan, if an Alfa.
Amen: a pie -- Ipanema.
Drat! Such custard!
"Ma", Jerome raps, "Spare more jam."
Stressed was I ere I saw desserts.
Stratagem: megatarts.
Trade trat's tart, Ed -- Art.


HEALTHY EATING
Sup not on pus.
No ham, Mahon.
No lemons, no melon.
Desserts stress, Ed.
Ban campus motto: "Bottoms up, MacNab."

VEGETARIANISM
Ate plate late, petal et al. -- PETA.
"Emu fat!", Edna and Eta fume.
UFO tofu.
We freed fine venison. No sin, even if deer few.

OTHER FOOD PROHIBITIONS AND PREFERENCES
Lived on decaf; faced no devil.
Lisa Bonet ate no basil.
Nole Monet ate no melon.
He, "I prefer pi, eh?"

FOOD ADVENTURISM (unusual foods)
Lion oil.
Tangy gnat.
God, a red nugget. A fat egg under a dog.
Kayak salad -- Alaska yak.
Raw burger. Re grub -- war!
So, catfood lid = dildo of tacos.
Uvula -- 'A luv U.

ENTERTAINING AT HOME
Bacon -- no cab.
Do offer ref food.
Enid and Edna dine.
"Dennis and Edna dine", said I, as Enid and Edna sinned.
Dennis, Rod, Enid and Edna dined or sinned.
A man, a plate, snoop spoons et al. -- Panama.
Won't figs gift now?

RESTAURANTS
A man, a pang, a salad, a lasagna -- Panama.
Amen: a pizza, jazz -- Ipanema.
Ate pasta-salad, alas. -- 'At's-a PETA.
A tip: "Le Falafel" -- pita.
Nail a tired rotini in it; order Italian.
Oozy ran I, Luc, at a culinary zoo.
Start trats.
Tip it if I tip it.

FOOD and RELATED HEALTH PROBLEMS
A gassy baby's saga.
Burger murders: re drum, re grub.
No Sir, away! -- a papaya war is on.
Sis -- emesis.
Night nets tenth gin.
Pure, boss is -- Sober up!

DIRECTION FOR WEB-ADVENTURERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of June 2024, there are over 1500 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.) The 'Daily' format has the advantage of including Giorgio's photo-collages, song-lyrics and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.







Saturday 15 June 2024

CANADIANA, part #3

 

previous posted poems (part#1) 
Canadian spelling
speech borrowings
Canadian moose
Canadian weather
Torontonian / Buffalonian
compassionate use
overwintering waterfowl
seniors' hockey
previous posted poems (part#2)
Kim Jong Un's visit
snow-biota
Thanksgiving, Canadian
Haida Gwaii
joual
prairie home
Mounties
Canadian raising (linguistics)

CURRENT CONTENTS
Nanaimo bars
Canadian origins
Crept and leapt
Newfoundland potato famine (3 verses, a 'brief saga')
Other related sagas -- Canada ("national verse")
                                         --  Chemainus, B.C. ("exotic destinations")










Authors' Note:   We have the good fortune in Canada, in some instances, of choosing either standard British grammar or the American version thereof. In the US, the commonly employed past tenses are "creeped" and "leaped"; these would alter the rhyming of the poem's second and fourth lines. A US-compatible version of this poem is also in the works, and can be found HERE (link under construction).



(Note that the three verses of this "brief saga" can be found in more readily legible format on the blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense"; click HERE.) 



CANADA ("National verse")


(Note that the four verses of this "brief saga" can be found in more readily legible format on the blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense"; click HERE.) 



CHEMAINUS ("Exotic destinations")


(Note that the six verses of this "brief saga" can be found in more readily legible format on the blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense"; click HERE.) 


Trent-Severn (Ontario nostalgia)
Great Lakes (Ontario nostalgia)
Franglais (savoir-faire)





DIRECTION FOR WEB-ADVENTURERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of June 2024, there are over 1500 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.) The 'Daily' format has the advantage of including Giorgio's photo-collages, song-lyrics and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.

Monday 10 June 2024

MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE, part #3


This post is a continuation of "MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE part#1", posted for your entertainment on this blog on June 15, 2021, and "part 2", posted on May 5, 2022.

previously posted poems
angwantibo
bats
beaver
buffalo
California sea lion
coyotes, plastic
Cretan goat ("kri-kri")
(upsetting) gnus 
gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla)
hippopotami / hippopotamuses
hoary marmots
horsing around
mongolian gerbils
(concupiscent) rabbits
raccoons in the city
raccoons in the swamp

CURRENT CONTENTS:
Selfie with bison
Skunks
Star-nosed moles
Steller sea lions
Woodchucks
related verse
Aegean cats (3 verses, a brief saga)



Authors' NoteIt's hard to believe that there was a 'responsible driver' who let this young person out of the car to take this picture (isolated from a published video), but there you are. 

In national parks in both Canada and the United States, there are fines imposed for approaching wildlife too closely, and signage usually makes this abundantly clear.

A verse, and more pictures of the American bison (buffalo), can be found on this post








Authors' Note:  You can find a song about the star-nosed mole on our blog 'Edifying Nonsense'. Click HERE to access it! 



Authors' Note:  A falling birth rate due to 'nutritional stress' in females (along with ongoing hunting) has been proposed as a principal factor in the decline in the last century of Pacific Ocean populations of the Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus. Although wanton polygamy has, to be honest, always been an option for females of this species of magnificent marine mammals, the particular efforts of concerned individuals like our heroine Bella may have contributed to a recent recovery.

   Current ecological terminology denotes a species whose population is stable in the wild and not threatened as of 'lesser concern'. In 2013, the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) took the Steller sea lion off its US Endangered Species List.






Authors' Note:  The woodchuck or groundhog is a large squirrel-like animal
best know for its extensive tunneling. Although herbivorous, it is not normally interested in eating or tossing wood, the latter being an activity for which 
it is poorly physically adapted. 

   Apparently, the name woodchuck is a corruption of the Algonquian word wejack; the name also is responsible for the American tongue-twister: 

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
 


(Note that the three verses of this "brief saga" can be found in more readily legible format on the blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense"; click HERE.) 


DIRECTION FOR WEB-ADVENTURERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of June 2024, there are over 1500 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.) The 'Daily' format has the advantage of including Giorgio's photo-collages, song-lyrics and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.


Wednesday 5 June 2024

Poems about POSTAL PLACES: USA

DISCLOSURE: Our aim here is to tell a story in brief verse about a town in every state of the USA, using its name and two-letter state-postal-abbreviation, as would be used in addressing a letter. Obviously, we still have a very long way to go.

What is the origin of this project? 




                                              






In a much earlier effort, we concocted various anagram swarms, armadas of anagrams of various political buzzwords, e.g. C-O-N-S-T-I-T-U-T-I-O-N)  displayed on wordplay maps of the US. The display and readability of these maps was eased by omitting the standardized comma that separates the town and state, i.e. Total Suction, IN == > Total Suction IN. Some readers expressed concern about this shortcut, fearing that we were involved in an insurrection against the international postal standard. Hence we later adopted a scheme for a rigidly defined limerick, as shown in the examples below, that could be used to versify various postal entities (real and imaginary) while highlighting and honoring the standard postal format.  

As this project got started, we decided that we should also include Canada (so stay tuned to check our first Canadian efforts that will be available shortly).

CURRENT CONTENTS
Baton Rouge, LA
Champaign, IL
Hoboken, NJ
Fargo, ND
Duluth, MN
Green Bay, WI
more to follow



Authors' Note: 

LA is the official abbreviation for the American state of Louisiana, whose capital, Baton Rouge, with population 230,000, is situated 100 miles (160km) upriver from New Orleans.

The original site, protected from flooding by its situation on bluffs along the east side of the Mississippi, had originally been noted by exploring Europeans for a pole marking the dividing-line between two aboriginal territories. It was designated as the state capital in 1846, replacing New Orleans in that role, and with extension, its port became the tenth busiest in the US. The city hosts the flagship campuses of Louisiana State university and Southern University.

In recent decades, the Republican party acquired a strangle-hold on almost all local, state, and federal officials elected in Louisiana. Although Louisiana is otherwise agreed as being one of the locales on the planet most affected by climate changecoastal erosion and other negative results of human activity, resistance to that realization seems strongly entrenched locally.



Authors' Note: 

Chicagoan: resident of Chicago, IL

urbane: sophisticated, elegant, worldly

No banana!: slang for 'not prize-winning'

No pain, no gain: slang phrase indicating hard work as a requirement for advancement.

IL is the official abbreviation for the American state of Illinois, in which two neighboring towns, Champaign, population 88,000 and Urbana, population 38,000, make up the metropolitan area of Champaign-Urbana, located 135 miles (215 km) south of the megalopolis of Chicago. The names of both towns, dating from the nineteenth century, relate to earlier settlements in the nearby state of Ohio.

Champaign-Urbana, IL is home to the flagship campus of the University of Illinois, and offers an appropriate spectrum of cultural opportunities. Surrounded by an extensive, flat, mid-west farming district, it is on occasion, as here, disparaged by residents of Chicago for its lack of "urbanity".
   


Authors' Note: MN is the official abbreviation for the American state of Minnesota, in which Duluth, a town with population 90,000 is situated. At the western end of lake Superior, the town was transiently, at the beginning of the 1900s, the busiest port in the United States.

The town's unusual name derives from the area's first known European explorer, the French soldier Daniel Greysolon, Sieur du Lhut. Duluth is now home to the annual "Magic Smelt Parade" and the University of Minnesota Duluth. Despite the region's French connection, the largest immigrant group in Minnesota has hailed from Scandinavia, accounting for the Swedish name of the verse's protagonist.

"Telephone-booth stuffing" was a short-lived global craze among college-age kids in the 1950s. Of interest, in the UK the activity was known as "telephone-booth squash", and the "rules" required that a phone-call be made from the overcrowded booth.





Authors' Note: ND is the official abbreviation for the American state of North Dakota, whose largest city is Fargo with a population of 126,000. Located on the floodplain of the Red River, the city was named after William Fargo, director of the Northern Pacific Railway and honcho of Wells Fargo Express.




Authors' Note: WI is the official abbreviation for the American state of Wisconsin, in which the city of Green Bay, population 110,000, is situated. Founded in 1634 as a French trading post, this settlement on the northern part of Lake Michigan was known in its earlier days as La Baie Verte. Today it is best known as the home of the football team "Green Bay Packers"; activities of the city's priesthood are described in Chuck Folkers' poem Holy Communion.



Authors' Note:  NJ is the official abbreviation for the American state of New Jersey, in which Hoboken, a town with population of about 60,000, is situated, commuting distance from New York City.

The town was first settled by Europeans in the 17th century as part of the New Netherland colony. Following the Dutch era, it became known as the site of the first recorded game of baseball, and as the birthplace (1915) and hometown of Frank Sinatra. 


FOLLOW-UP (Canadian, eh?)
You can sneak a peak at our efforts in Canada by clicking HERE!


DIRECTION FOR WEB-ADVENTURERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of June 2024, there are over 1500 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.) The 'Daily' format has the advantage of including Giorgio's photo-collages, song-lyrics and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.