Saturday 25 July 2020

Submitted Palindromes, Intro to presenters, #7 -- Pedro, the Goofy 'Dromer





To help eager readers move back and forth, here are links to the profiles of each of our seven frequent (and usually dependable) contributors to our open request for submitted palindromes.
The editors of this blog feel that palindromes are inherently present in our language, so the presence of the less famous items is reported, discovered, or re-discovered by these writers, rather than being the "creation" of a particular word-artist. In other words you may have seen some of their offerings on lists of palindromes elsewhere, but that is no problem for us. 

(Pedro, the Goofy 'Dromer)

Now, you have met our entire cohort of regularly submitting armchair palindromists. You might want to proceed to our next blogpost to see how they handle challenges such as spoofing particular entities in the classic repertoire. Start by seeing their creative reactions to "A man, a plan, a canal -- Panama" by clicking HERE. 

Monday 20 July 2020

JUL 20 (2020), MAGICAL ADVANCED PALINDROMES: Definition and Derivation


EDITOR: Giorgio Coniglio, December, 2016. 

An unrecognized subtype of "advanced palindrome" has been developed by the authors. A pair of related shorter palindromes is usually required as a starting point. These can be drawn from the classic palindrome repertoire, but related forms developed by the author are included. 















































You can view our entire collection of these intriguing wordplay oddities, in a post on our blog "Edifying Nonsense", entitled Magical Palindromes: a compendium".


DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: (updated June 2024)
To resume daily titillations on our related blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense", click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of June 2024, there are over 1500 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on "Edifying Nonsense" in topic-based collections.) The "Daily" format has the advantage of including Giorgio's photo-collages, song-lyrics and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.






Friday 17 July 2020

The frontier of poetry: haiku and associated limericks (origin of 'palinku')

 

















You can continue this astounding journey, exploring our new poetic form. Click below for yearly collections of posted palinkus (one each month)as available on this blog-site.
2020: haiku and the origin of the 'palinku'
2020: early palinkus, from August 2000
2024 -- pending.
  
(Alternatively, you could proceed to our related blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense", where we have in a more casual manner, published these terse verses one-at-a-time, on the 17th day of each month. And while there, you might enjoy a few earlier postings involving poems in the more customary 'haiku' format.)


GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense", click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of March 2024, there are over 1400 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on "Edifying Nonsense" in topic-based collections.) The 'Daily' format also has the advantage of including some song-lyrics, videos and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.






Wednesday 15 July 2020

Edification about Word-Pairs: "The BINOMIALS", A Linguistic Lesson

 EDIFICATION about  WORDPLAY

ORIGINAL SONG: "The Elements", Tom Lehrer, 1959.

LESSON COMPOSED: Dr. G.H. and Giorgio Coniglio, 2015. This explanation is required for the reader to understand the material on Word-Pairs that underlies the second through fifth song in the collection of 9 parodies.

BINOMIALS: We are dealing here with a linguistic device discussed by Wikipedia as “Siamese twins” or ‘Irreversible Binomials”. These 
phrases include some of the most colorful expressions in English. There are probably a thousand binomial expressions in the English language. To enhance the singability, I have skewed my selection of binomial pairs here, to emphasize those that have alliteration of the 2 elements. 
For discussion of binomials on an earlier post (January 5, 2017)click herethat post also honours our previous exploration of these intriguing expressions, and is entitled "The Allure of Word-Pairs: Alliterative Binomials (compendium)".

UKULELE and GUITAR-FRIENDLY LINK: Our whole series of songs can be found in a friendly format for ukulele- and guitar-players on our sister blog "SILLY SONGS and SATIRE". Click here to proceed to this site. But note that as it is a 'private blog' you will need to arrange access, if you don't already have it. Leave a comment on this post if you want to access the version with chord-charts and helpful performing suggestions. 



loonie and toonie: rhyming coins







#1



#2






#3



 
#4



#5



#6




#7

AND, A TRIBUTE TO BINOMIALS IN POETRY


HOT LINKS to WORD-PAIR PARODY LYRICS,
here on the wordplay-poetry-lyrics blog "Edifying Nonsense" ...


DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
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Friday 10 July 2020

Lyrics for Singable Satire: NOVEL MELODIES for LIMERICKS (continuation)

 

Song Lyrics for Adapted Limerick Verses, a continuation of a previous post , where you can find the first five melodies in the series.

ORIGINAL SONGS: as per links.
LINKED LIMERICK MEDLEYS: Lyrics by Giorgio Coniglio set to the music of the indicated songs, mostly shown in previous blogposts.
SATIRE COMPOSED: Giorgio Coniglio, 2017 and 2018. Hotlinks are given for  posts using these new musical adaptations, and will be updated when possible.



NOVEL MELODIES for SINGING LIMERICKS











6. "OCHI CHORNYE" ("DARK EYES" – ‘traditional’ Russian 1884)
Oh, those gorgeous eyes, dark and glorious eyes
Burn-with-passion eyes, how you hypnotize.
How I adore you so, / how I fear you though
Since I say you glow! Now my spirit’s low!

Limerick Adaptation 
(Moderate changes)
Once was oligarch from Nantucket
Stuck all cash in pail. Tax? He’d duck it.
But his daughter Nan / Had a man with plan --
Informed KGB, then stole bucket.


Hotlink to lyrics blogpost "RUSSIAN HACKING: Red Army Choir Sings Classical Limericks".


7. "ODE TO JOY" ("AN DIE FREUDE"; adapted  by L. von Beethoven 1824 for his Ninth [choral] Symphony 
from a poem by Friedrich Schiller 1785; designated the Anthem of Europe in 1972.)
Deine Zauber binden wieder
Was die Mode streng geteilt;
Alle Menschen werden Brüder
Wo dein sanfter Flügel weilt.

Limerick Adaptation (significant changes)
In a case that Freud had mentioned,
Dean hid fortune in a can.
Daughter Joy found lottery winnings,
Filched his bucket; off she ran.


Hotlink to Wikipedia 'ODE TO JOY'.


8. THE SLOOP ‘JOHN B’ (traditional Bahamian, recorded by Kingston Trio 1958)
Oh, we came on the sloop ‘John B’ – my grandfather and me
‘Round Nassau town we did roam.
Drinkin’ all night, we got into a fight.
Oh, I feel so break-up, I wanna go home.

Limerick Adaptation (significant changes)
My Grandpa felt out of luck; on Nantucket he was stuck,
So credit cards and cash he hid in a pail;
Til his daughter Nan / rowed off with her man;
They’d plucked Pop's bucket, but now they’re in jail.


Hotlink to Wikipedia 'THE SLOOP JOHN B'.


DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2023, there are over 1200 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.) The 'Daily' format also has the advantage of including some videos and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.





Sunday 5 July 2020

DEATH and the AFTERLIFE #1


CURRENT CONTENTS:
Cardiac arrest
Decease in the crease
Dining in Heaven
End-of-life care
Garbage in Heaven
Giving up the ghost
Ghostbusters
Heavenly pie
(for continuation, see the link below)




Authors' Note:   Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is the major cause of sudden otherwise-unexplained death.  This emergency demands chest compression as well as other resuscitative maneuvers by trained lay standers-by, ambulance workers and emergency room staff. Unfortunately, the ultimate success rate of such resuscitative measures in this setting remains quite low. 





Authors' Note: In hockey, an assist is recognition awarded to a player who passes the puck to the goal-scorer at a key point in play. A sudden death system for resolving the winner in games tied at the end of regulation play has generally been used in organized hockey since its inception. The (goal) crease is an area demarcated by colored ice directly in front of the goal line where the goalie (goalkeeper) is not to be interfered with by attackers.

Although professional hockey has been the undisputed domain of males, more and more women are participating in Canada's national sport as amateurs and international competitors.












Authors' Note: In some jurisdictions, all deaths in a long-term nursing facility must be reported to the office of the coroner.





Authors' Note: You may have gathered that the editors think that Heaven is a bureaucracy-ridden place. So, of course, as a resident there you may  have to fill out a lot of documentation to obtain permission to import Earthworms and related paraphernalia.
 








Authors' Note: My partner's sweet apple pie is 'to die for', and so is the strawberry pie pictured above..


The editors have been besieged with requests for more poems on this topic, so you can proceed, if you like, to "Death and the Afterlife #2" by clicking HERE.



GENERAL DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of February 2023, there are 1100 entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.)