Sunday 15 January 2023

Grandpa Greg's Advanced Grammar: NEOLOGISMS (personal)


CURRENT CONTENTS:
Dyscoprotaxis
Potusa
Awarassment
Electile dysfunction
More to follow
















Other personal neologisms highlighted as the subject of verses on Giorgio's blogs: 
pelicatessen ("Waterfowl")
DOGgraphy  ("Diagnostic Imaging")

And, playing a supporting role: high-nastypelflesscritiquery and remissitude.


Don't like Giorgio's choice in personal neologisms? Stay tuned, and in March we will let you in on some verses about 'classic' neologisms.


DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2023, there are over 1200 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.) The 'Daily' format has the advantage of including some videos and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.

Tuesday 10 January 2023

Poetic NON-SEQUITURS #2


This blogpost is a continuation of material developed for a blog-post in 2021 entitled "Non-Sequiturs #1'. 

previous poetic postings (#1)
almost kosher
autophagia
bush plane
charity auction
close quarters
cumulative songs
demolition
dishwasher


CURRENT CONTENTS:
Doggy bag
Epistaxis
ESL (W-I-P)
Far-flung family
Gavel (judge's)
Gifted children
Having the audacity
Hoggishly
(for continuation, see the link below)






Authors' Note
peccadillo: loan-word from Spanish meaning 'little sin’
epistaxis (eh-pih-STAK-sihs): bleeding from the nostrils








Authors' Note: For educators, giftedness, e.g. in intellectual abilities, implies an ability significantly above average that motivates differences in school programming. For gifted children, social isolation from the majority of their age-peers is a major problem in their development and maturation. Various educational theories and practices abound in attempting to deal with this problem.  











These collections are arranged pretty much alphabetically. If you want to see the third instalment, click HERE.




DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
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Thursday 5 January 2023

Grandpa Greg's Advanced Grammar: (re)DUPLICATIONS, part #1


CURRENT CONTENTS

Clap-trap
Cootchie-(cootchie-)coo
Dilly-dally
Fuddle-duddle
Fuddy-duddy
Hanky-panky
Harum-scarum
Helter-skelter
(for continuation, see the link below)


Authors' Note:  Reduplications as they are best known, sometimes also called duplications, are language forms (morphs), usually for nouns, in which an element of the word is repeated with little or no change; they figure prominently among the most musical elements in English and in other languages. To this author, the more commonly used term seems redundant. 

The disparaging term gobbledegook was first used in 1944 by a Texas politician named Maverick (scion of the original staunchly independent thinker). Its meaning — pompous, overinflated language — gave rise a few year later to the equivalent bafflegab. These expressions, employing repetition of sounds, have a musical and amusing quality, as do their venerable synonyms --hogwashpoppycockbalderdashbunkum and tommyrot, but only their close cousin claptrap (alternately clap-trap) -- would qualify as a reduplication.



Authors' NoteCootchie coo, sometimes cootchie cootchie coo, with its many spelling variants, has evolved as a (re)duplication voiced when tickling a baby, or possibly other targets, as described [[47817:here]]. Bloviation, and the blowhard are described in other verses.




Authors' Note: The essential appended line (L6) of this verse is acknowledged by the author to have a puzzling rhyming scheme, although the latter is partly offset by the action taking place near the palpitatingly iconic Palindrome Valley. Another redeeming feature is that, unlike the other half-dozen or so other poems on this topic at the collaborative online site OEDILF, it is gratifyingly concordant with the normal conversational stressing of DIL-ly-dal-ly on its first syllable.

Another view of wordplay competitions in Palindrome Valley can be found HERE.





Authors' Note: (usually, FUD-uhl-dud-uhl, or with a French lilt, as here, fud-uhl-DUD-uhl)

fuddle-duddle: 
an infrequently used (re)duplication, voiced dismissively in dealing with opinions that the speaker rejects.

In 1971 Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, father of current PM Justin Trudeau, unleashed a minor scandal by using unparliamentary language in the Canadian House of Commons (parliament). A portion of the ensuing brouhaha, deftly sidestepped by Trudeau, revolved around whether he had actually spoken or merely mouthed the inappropriate words.

Web discussion:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuddle_duddle



Authors' Note: 

(FUD-ee-dud-ee, or as a possibility here, fud-ee-DUD-ee). Another example of a (re)duplication.




Authors' Note: Reduplications as they are best known, sometimes also called duplications, are language forms (morphs), usually for nouns, in which an element of the word is repeated with little or no change; they figure prominently among the most musical elements in English and in other languages. To this author, the more commonly used term seems redundant. Many other examples begin with the letter 'h', e.g. harum-scarum, helter-skelter, higgeldy-piggeldyhillbilly, and hubba-hubba.








SONGS about REDUPLICATIONS!

The authors of the above poetic verses got so enthused about reduplications that they composed a series of patter-songs (in the style of Tom Lehr) dealing with this intriguing linguistic curiosity. If you follow along these links you can learn more grammar, and see dozens of surprising and enlightening examples of this phenomenon. Grab your ukulele, your guitar, or just your larynx, and enjoy singing along!
1)  Lyrics for Singable Satire: "A LESSON ABOUT REDUPLICATIONS


For more intriguing verses about "(re)DUPLICATIONS", please proceed to part #2 by clicking HERE. 


DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2023, there are over 1200 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.) The 'Daily' format has the advantage of including some videos and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.