Wednesday 15 December 2021

Reversing Verse: Limericks about CLASSIC PALINDROMES #5


 This post provides a continuation of previous wordplay collections displayed on December 5, 2020January 5, 2021, February 5, 2021, and March 10, 2021. In those earlier posts, classic palindromes (phrases and sentences whose letters are ordered identically when they are read either forwards or backwards) were described and extolled in verse; the topics of discussion, eight in each post, were as follows: 
1. Dennis sinned            
2. Drawn onward
3Gnu dung
4. Yreka bakery
5. Lonely Tylenol
6. UFO tofu
7. Too hot to hoot
8. Never odd or even 
-------------------------
9. Sex at noon taxes
10No 'X' in Nixon.
11. A Santa at NASA
12. T. Eliot's toilet
13. Madam, I'm Adam
14. Sex of foxes
15. Able ere Elba
16. A Toyota's a Toyota
--------------------------
17. Mr. Owl ate my metal worm
18. Emil's lime
19. Critique of palindromes, To idiot: 
20. A dim or fond 'No!' from Ida
21. No lemon, no melon (fruitless)
22. 'Contrived' (saw- and see- lines)
23. Flee to me, remote elf
24. No sir, prison (Roger Stone) 
---------------------------------------
25. Zeus sees Suez (canals)
26. Step on no pets  
27. Do geese see God?  
28. No 'D'; No 'L' -- London (negation)
29. Dogma? I am God
30. Mix a maxim
31. Egad! no bondage
32. Go hang a salami..... 
----------------------------------------


CURRENT CONTENTS

Please note that, continuing the convention adopted in the previous posts, there will be an exclusive correlation between green italicized font and palindromes. But not all of the palindromes displayed within the verses' lines are in the 'classic repertoire'. Some are recent concoctions by the author. 

33. Racecar
34. No left felon 
35. A man, a plan, a canal -- Panama
36. The Dacha: palindrome-enhanced American satire, a brief saga
37. Leigh Mercer's Palindrome Workshop, a brief saga


Authors' Note: Embedded within the verse are eight palindromic phrases, each in italics and green font, separated from each other by semicolons.

   This perseverating nonsense may be partly explained by the author having driven a 2002 Toyota Camry as his only automobile since 2009. That no car can compete for efficiency, value and longevity is embodied in the classic palindromic phrase A Toyota's a Toyota (see the linked previous post for further discussion.)  


Authors' Note: Apparently a few felons are politicians, and vice versa.











But, there are also more versified classic palindromes to review. Proceed to the next collection and view classic spoofs on the IPP (Iconic Panama Palindrome) HERE ! 


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Friday 10 December 2021

The frontier of poetry: the first ten PALINKUs


palinku



An additional point: Where do these palindromes come from?
The majority are in the 'classic repertoire' of this constrained but nonsensical form of writing. The authors are proud to report that they have apparently concocted the remainder. 
  
If you feel that you need more enlightenment about palindromes before proceeding, we have a sort of lesson entitled "POLITICAL PALINDROMES" that appears in serialized form on our other blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense". You can undertake that adventure by clicking HERE for 'slide A'.  





palinku































You can continue this astounding journey, exploring our new poetic form. Click HERE for more palinkus.


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Sunday 5 December 2021

Grandpa Greg's Advanced Grammar: BINOMIAL EXPRESSIONS, part #1

Editors' Note:  Before proceeding to these collections of short verses, reader might benefit from reviewing an earlier post entitled Edification about Word-Pairs: "The Binomials", A Linguistic Lesson

CURRENT CONTENTS:
Hale and hearty 
Hug and kiss
Food and drink 
First and last
Sin and redemption
Down and out
Betwixt and between
Hem and haw,
plus many others that play a supporting role in the verses
(check the link below for a follow-up series)






Authors' Note A binomial pair, phrase, or expression, is a language element consisting of a pair of words that are used in a fixed order as an idiom. The two members of the pair are the same part of speech, are semantically related, often near-synonyms or antonyms, and are most commonly joined by and, or or; they often play a role as clich├ęs. The term irreversible binomial was coined and extensively discussed by American philologist Yakov Malkiel in 1954. The most catchy of these phrases are alliterative, as hale and hearty, or rhyming, as in near and dear, or haste makes waste.









 Authors' Note: Binomial expressions combine two paired elements in a fixed order. Lists of these phrases show that when the two genders are in question, males almost always come first. This bias is shown in dozens of idioms such as boys and girlslords and ladiesmen and womenbrother and sisterkings and queensJack and Jill, etc.

The few notable exceptions highlight a gender-constrained role for women, including belles and beausbride and groom, and moms and dads.

Gender-bias in language is also discussed in another verse by the authors. Click HERE




Authors' Note: The forty-fifth US president and his advisors seem to have come up with a scare tactic, telling voters that waves of Central American refugees appearing on the southern US border were comprised of potential rapists and drug-dealers. The 'redemption' referred to here is entry into the safe refuge of the United States.   

For binomial expressions, such as sin and redemption, there is (in normal times) a mandatory, irreversible order of the two linguistic elements.







Authors' Note:   The concept of fossil words derives from the fact that dozens of obsolete and obscure words, e.g. betwixt, retain currency only as a part of idioms whose use has continued into modern times. The final line of the verse refers to beck and callgoods and chattels, and hither and yon.
 
 More examples of fossil words and phrases are given in the verse hem and haw.



Authors' Note:   The astute reader might realize that "whence, wherefore and whither" (like "snug as a bug in a rug") is a TRInomial phrase, a less common entity.  


For more verses about  "Binomial Expressions", please proceed to part #2 by clicking HERE


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Monday 15 November 2021

Variant Verses: SPOOFS on the ICONIC NANTUCKET LIMERICKS











Authors' Note:
Bay Stater: current official designation for a resident of the US state of Massachusetts   

















Editor's Warning: You have to provide proof that you are more than 12 years in age to read the following two verses.







moose may be found at U. of T.
(the University of Toronto),
but not on Vancouver Island










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Wednesday 10 November 2021

Progress in Poetry: BI-LYRICAL VERSE

This blogpost will give you more understanding and a lot of helpful examples related to a type of creative limerick variation indulged in by the authors. To see the whole spectrum of our efforts, you might want to take the time to review "A Corner of the Poet's World: LIMERICK VARIATIONS".




Authors' Note

  Despite the message of the verse, the author has taken pains to construct a slate of dual rhyme scheme, or bi-lyrical limericks, including the above instance; the rhyme scheme can be characterized as: 

line 1:  C...A
line 2:  C...A
line 3:  D...B
line 4:  D...B
line 5:  C...A.  


 I'm addicted to crafting verse terse,
 Though constricted by constructs perverse.
 To use dual-scheme rhymes
 Can confuse me at times;
 But, inflicted on readers? That's worse!

In the above verse, the additional C- and D-pattern rhymes are distinguished using green font. The scansion (pattern of beats), usually involves stressing the third syllable in each line (as indicated by underlining). In this instance, this pattern is broken in the third line of the verse.














Authors' Note: Goof is used here in a sense overlapping with goofball for a person whose behavior, silly and inept (or 'goofy'), is seen by others as scoff-worthy.

To date, the archives on the OEDILF site lists over 60 limerick entries that are spoofs on the classic Nantucket limericks. And, you might enjoy seeing some of Giorgio's contribution to that oeuvre, as collected in a post entitled 'Variant Verse: Spoofs on the Iconic Nantucket LimerickHERE.












Conversion disorder presenting as aphonia (the state of not being able to speak) is an occasionally encountered disorder with a psychologic basis.




 Authors' note: We (i.e. Dr. G.H. and his registered pseudonym Giorgio) have two brothers who have each written a textbook in his chosen field of endeavour. Our personal choice, however, is to indulge in the delights of poetry, using rhyme rather than free verse as our preferred modality.  





You might also want to check out a few other examples of this intriguing two-for-one poetic format. Check the collection here on 'Numbers', in particular Four.  Moreover, the first verse of the 3-stanza brief saga 'Domestic Turkeys' is  written with a bi-lyrical rhyming  scheme. 


These poems comprise a particular type of limerick variant. To see a wider collection of thoughts on such dastardly derived doggerel, click on the collection "Limerick Variations: A Corner of the Poet's World" HERE



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