Wednesday 25 August 2021

AUG 25 (2021), submitted palindromes: C, targeted at "A SANTA ... AT NASA""



 

You might be one of those readers who enjoys the above format, in which the panel of our most prolific submitters have a go at spoofing certain well-known and well-loved classic phrases in the palindrome repertoire. 

  If, in fact, that is the case, you might enjoy taking a look at our other funky posts ...
 

 B:  Dennis sinned.


  D: Won't lovers revolt now?




 I: Embargos so grab me. (Link available after August 25, 2024).

 J: Zeus sees Suez. (Link available after February 25, 2025).  

Moreover, there are at the beginning of this series (back in 2020), literary profiles of our principal contributors, and lots of posts showing random piles of their work. This material can all be found by searching this blog for "submitted", or by sorting date-wise through the lists of post-topics in the right-hand column of the blog.   
 

Friday 20 August 2021

AUG 20 (2021), MAGICAL CANAL PALINDROMES


Swan guiding barge,
lower end of St-Martin Canal

The current offering represents a followup to a slew of recent map-art blogposts by Giorgio Coniglio and Dr. GH. With all this mental energy focusing backwards and forwards on palindromes, it is hard to avoid the subject of canalsAnd to help wordplay-buffs focus on palindromes about canals, here is an ancient blogpost on the subject: CANALINDROMES



...

Also, check out these collections of wordplay-maps by Dr. G.H. and Giorgio Coniglio (registered pseudonym)
 - Tourists' Palindromic Guide: The Old World #1
 - Tourists' Palindromic Guide: The Old World #2
 - Tourists' Palindromic Guide: The Old World #3
 - Tourists' Palindromic Guide: The Old World #4
and...
 - Tourists' Palindromic Guide: The Americas #1
 - 
Tourists' Palindromic Guide: The Americas #2
 - Tourists' Palindromic Guide: The Americas #3
 - Tourists' Palindromic Guide: The Americas #4
 - INTRODUCTORY CONCLUSION: The Tourists' Palindromic Guides

 
To read more about the origin, creation and listing of magical palindromes, click or cluck here to get to Giorgio's original blogpost on the topic.






You might want to check out Wikipedia's article on the Panama (Ecuadorian) hat.












And, a last minute reprieve... For those who find that they are delighted by magical canal palindromes, and can't live without more of them, we have just concocted a follow-up post, entitled "Unplanned Canals"

Or, if you just want to consider the romance of canals (without the wordplay), you might like to calmly review our collection of posts entitled "The love of canals". Click HERE


DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: (updated June 2024)
To resume daily titillations on our related blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense", click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of June 2024, there are over 1500 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on "Edifying Nonsense" in topic-based collections.) The "Daily" format has the advantage of including Giorgio's photo-collages, song-lyrics and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.

Sunday 15 August 2021

Scatologic Verse: The BOTTOM LINE of MEDICAL HUMOR



CURRENT CONTENTS:
Anorectal disorders
Borborygmi
Flatus
Diarrhea
G.I.T. (gastrointestinal tract)
Beano
Anal fissure
Hemorrhoids





Authors' Note: In North America, many proctologists now prefer to be known (professionally) as 'colorectal surgeons'.



Authors' NoteBorborygmi (plural of the Latin borborygmus, a normal phenomenon, are rumbling noises in the abdomen related to movement of fluid and gas through gastrointestinal viscera (hollow organs).







 Authors' Note:  
  euphemism allows one to skirt around the messy details. 
  Diarrhea, a term coined by Hippocrates, derives from the Greek for a flow going through; the details are linked by longstanding usage to the specific intestinal inconvenience, sometimes characterized as "the trots".
  The authors regret that there are no appropriate images to accompany this verse.



Authors' Note: The concept of a formal truce was approached by both parties following the authors' misguided indulgence in the preparation for an endoscopic procedure.







Authors' Note

cruciferae: vegetables in the cabbage family
Aspergillus: more fully, Aspergillus niger, the species of fungus from which chemists derive alpha-galactosidase, the principal active enzyme ingredient of flatulence-suppressants.  The concept of a supplement to suppress the discomfort and gas associated with eating vegetables such as beans and cabbage was presumably proposed by Benjamin Franklin in the 1780s. In 1981, Alan Kligerman initiated research that resulted in the development of the commercial enzymatic supplement Beano® , and a Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1991. 

  





Authors' Note: 'Aneous', a puerile neologism, has been used here to close the verse, as the proper medical term 'anus' may not function appropriately in this instance.
 

Authors' Note:  The long-term effectiveness of surgical and other treatments for hemorrhoids is disappointingly low. 





Here's a LIST OF LINKS to collections of intriguing poems (over 160 of these!) on medical/dental topics that can now be found on various posts. 


DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2022, there are 1000 entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.)



Tuesday 10 August 2021

Pathos and Poetry: GUN CONTROL VERSES (revisited)

CURRENT CONTENTS:
Sem-automatic weapons
Concealed carry
Second Amendment rights
Mother Emanuel church
Anger and guns
"Good-guy" shooters
Hitman























   If you have enjoyed these verses on the theme of American political satire, you might like to proceed to view other items in our collection including:
- 'American satire: A Term of Endirement'
- 'a brief saga: Mar-a Lago'
- 'political palindromes A through P' (click HERE to start)

   There are also some parody-song lyrics posted in 2019 and 2020, that you might like, including: 
- 'The Ballad of Giuliani', part I and part II.



DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2022, there are 1000 entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.)

Thursday 5 August 2021

Progress in Poetry: LIMERICK VARIATIONS


CURRENT CONTENTS:
Epitomy of boredom
Lengthy limericks ("addendum-icitis")
The multi-verse universe
Singable limericks
Illustrated verse
"Limerrhoids" (C-rhyme extension)
Dual rhyme-schemes
Terminal exclamation
Identity rhymes (homophonous revelries)






Authors' Note:  Although a limerick is traditionally conceived as a 5-line concoction, once a sixth line ('L6') is developed, it may become an inherent part of the poem. The rule of the majority being what it is, on the OEDILF site for creating well-honed limericks, the L6 is often demeaned as being only an addendum. The reader may detect that the editors of this blog (Dr. G. H. and his registered pseudonym G. C.) are supporters of efforts to avoid the crashing boredom of a universe of traditional 5-liners.
  
On this daily blog, 6-line verses, otherwise adhering to limerick form, can be found on about 150 blogposts for the interval January 2020 to March 2024; generally these involve a single final "extra" line following the A-rhyme pattern used in lines 1,2, and 5. On occasion, in another 2-3 dozen poems, second or third appended lines have also been added; we have named these verses of 7 or more lines "run-on limericks". 




Authors' Note  The authors can box themselves into writing single defining limericks in the standard format used at OEDILF, the online humor dictionary, and have done so several hundred times. However, they delight in multi-verse limericks which provide a richer space for development of plot lines, contrasts and examples. Currently (December 2023), Giorgio’s Author's Showcase at the OEDILF website displays more than 90 multi-verse entries.         
   


                      Thanks to MMH for providing the photo, taken in Honolulu.



Authors' Note

pic: informal abbreviation for picture

   The authors have the experience of posting on their blogs (as here), hundreds of their OEDILF limericks that are initially framed as Power-Point slides with embedded pictures (fabric art, paintings including portraits, cell-phone-camera and web-photos) and computer-generated graphics. If the illustrations are abundant, additional slides may be used for elucidation, and are a good vehicle for displaying the Author's Notes. Poetic submissions that seem particularly appropriate for this type of enhancement include verses about biography, wildlife, tourist locations, food, visual arts and recreational activities.



LIMERRHOIDS


Author's Note:  Well, yes. This verse does go on at length (including a D-rhyme extension), but in a highly regulated fashion that would have been applauded by the famed lyrical seer. He obtained initial support by a cadre of Irish disciples, but to O'Malley's bitter disappointment, his efforts were unsustained globally. In recent writings, we have honored O'Malley's concept by the concoction of a score of poems of the type he would have approved. To view this specialized material that provides further explanation and  copious examples, click HERE !


DUAL RHYME-SCHEMES

Authors' NoteWe have a complete post (10 verses or so) devoted to limericks with dual rhyme schemes, as introduced HERE ...


TERMINAL (poetic) EXCLAMATION



Authors' NoteThis verse is the lead-in to a collection of limerick verses that emphasize a terminal exclamation, sometimes suggested earlier in the verse.
 Ka-pow! (variant kerpow!): comic-book type interjection for a noise emitted when a blow is landed in a fight (often involving a super-hero)
The limericks written by Edward Lear and his contemporaries a century ago often included repetition of the poem's key word at the end of the final line.



IDENTITY RHYMES (homophonous verse)

Authors' Note: This verse is the lead-in to a collection of limerick-like verses that have an unusual rhyming scheme. Instead of the usual A1,A2,B1,B2,A3 pattern, these verses have lines ending in identity rhymes, as in the above verse: A1,A1,B1,B1,A1. Some critics would say that identity rhymes, e.g. perVERSEely / conVERSEly, are not rhymes at all. But when bunched up they have a definite musicality, and can be entertainingly sung at open-mike at a bar. 


DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2023, there are over 1200 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.) The 'Daily' format also has the advantage of including some videos and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.