Friday 15 December 2023

Progress in Poetry: HOMOPHONOUS REVELRIES (Timelessly Rhymeless)

This blogpost will give you more understanding and helpful examples related to a type of creative limerick variation indulged in by the authors. To see the whole spectrum of our efforts, you might want to take the time to review "A Corner of the Poet's World: LIMERICK VARIATIONS".

In some circumstances, identity rhymes, e.g. perverse / reverse, are regarded by critics as "not even rhymes". Our opinion differs. 


CURRENT CONTENTS
Bypassed glitches
Corrective
Deserving
(Hippo's) hip replacement
Identity rhymes
Self-indulgence
Toast to French homophones




Authors' Note: Of course, the concept that bribes would be of benefit to authors submitting to the collaborative website OEDILF (Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Format)is patently nonsensical. There are a certain number of identity rhymes that appear in the database of edited verses there. The prosaic explanation, however, is that these bypassed initial glitches, being rather subtle in comparison with other flaws, are often under-observed and overlooked.







Authors' Note: 

syl: jargon used in the doggerel trade; a short form of syllable

Although the adjective deserving has come euphemistically to be applied to the needy, it classically was applied to people or things that were commendable or admirable
.


Author's Note: Hip replacement has become a surgical procedure that is frequently performed in humans, and is making inroads into veterinary practice in dogs and cats. Its role in jungle creatures and zoo inhabitants remains to be developed, parenthetically.




Authors' Note: Instead of the usual A1,A2,B1,B2,A3 pattern. the above verse has lines ending in identity rhymesA1,A1,B1,B1,A1. Some critics would say that such end-of-line parallel words, e.g. perVERSEely conVERSEly are not rhymes at all. But when bunched up they have a definite musicality, and can be entertainingly sung at open-mike at a bar. 







PARODY-SONGLINK: 
If you approved of the above poems indulging in homophonic rhymes, you might also enjoy a medley of songs about homonyms that can also be found on these pages. Start by clicking HERE







DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense", click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2023, there are over 1200 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on "Edifying Nonsense" in topic-based collections.) The "Daily" format has the advantage of including some videos, song-lyrics and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.

Sunday 10 December 2023

Grandpa Greg's Advanced Grammar: GREEK PREFIXES #2, in progress

A follow up to January 2022's post "Greek prefixes #1"

previous post (#1)
An-
Apo-
Auto-
Dia-
Dys-
Ecto-
Endo-
Epi-

CURRENT CONTENTS:
Eu-
Hyper- and hypo-
Chiro-
Chrono- 
more to follow










Authors' Note: These names for professional endeavours, derived from the Greek root chiro (hand), have quite different meanings and pronunciations.





DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense", click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2023, there are over 1200 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on "Edifying Nonsense" in topic-based collections.) The "Daily" format also has the advantage of including some videos and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.




Tuesday 5 December 2023

Progress in Poetry: RUN-ON LIMERICKS (A- and B- rhymes):


EXPLANATORY NOTES: 

  Yes, Virginia. There are "limericks" that have more than 5 lines. Readers of our blogs may well have noticed that a fair number of our verses (that otherwise scan and rhyme like traditional limericks) have a single extra line -- we have written and published over 100 of these 6-line "limerick variants". But, here is a compilation of a couple dozen verses in which the process is extended so that we land up with 7 lines rather than 5/6, a new category of verses that we have decided to name "run-on limericks".

  More importantly perhaps, the contentiously egregious concept of extending limerick verses by adding a pair of C-line rhymes (and occasionally even D-line rhymes) to the standard A- and B-line rhymes was introduced by the prophetic work of Irish limericist Seamus O'Malley, as will be discussed in a future blogpost HERE,  with further exemplification in  pair of follow-up post displaying over 20 such verses.

  To assist readers' further understanding of this issue, the C-extension results in an elegant non-standard 7-line verse, which we have called a "LIMERRHOID". One should beware, as not all 7-line limericks are the result of applying O'Malley's modification. Care must be taken not to confuse this process with the less rigorous addition of extra A- or B-rhyme lines, that result in a "Run-On Limerick".

  In the current post, we are displaying our collection of run-on limericks. Most of these involve the A-rhyme lines, i.e. 1,2,5, and now 6 and 7 (A,A,B,B,A,A,A). A smaller group involve the B-line rhymes, i.e. A,A,B,B,B,B,A. And there are even a few that are of mixed type. We admit that we are less proud of these run-ons than we are of the more creative limerrhoids. But we are pleased to let you know that, considering both types, we have authored more than 50 verses in the limerick family that have 7 lines per verse. And all are singable!!!










(the above foursome is awaiting final approval at OEDILF)





Individual terse verses in this collection can be viewed in a larger format, with their relevant "authors' notes", and oftentimes further photographic elaboration, on our companion blogpost "Daily Illustrated Nonsense".

Editorial Update: As of March 2024, you can now view our collection of edifying posts dealing with the C-rhyme extension of limerick verses that results in a 7- or more line entity known as a "limerrhoid".  Click HERE to get started.  

DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: To resume daily titillations on our related blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense", click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of December 2023, there are about 1400 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on "Edifying Nonsense" in topic-based collections.) The 'Daily' format has the advantage of including some videos and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.