Wednesday, 15 September 2021

Reversing Verse: PANAMA PALINDROME PARODIES (classic and novel)



   This post provides a continuation of wordplay collections displayed on December 5, 2020, through March 10, 2021. In these, classic palindromes (phrases and sentences whose letters are ordered identically when they are read either forwards or backwards) were described and extolled in verse by the team of Dr. G.H. and Giorgio Coniglio. The contents of the most recent post are: 

25. Zeus sees Suez 
26. Step on no pets  
27. Do geese see God?  
28. No 'D'; No 'L' -- London (negation) 
29. The IPP (iconic Panama palindrome): A man, a plan, a canal -- Panama
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For your review, here's Giorgio's verse about 'the IPP' (designated above as #29:









CURRENT CONTENTS

Please note that, continuing the convention adopted in the previous posts, there will be an exclusive correlation between green italicized font and palindromes. But not all of the palindromes displayed within the verses' lines are in the 'classic repertoire'. Some are recent concoctions by the authors. But of course, all the poems highlighting the wordplay  are verses written jointly by Dr. G.H. and Giorgio Coniglio.

1. Classic spoof on the IPP: A man, a potato -- Panama.
2. Classic spoof on the IPP: A man, a plan, a cat, a hat, a canal -- Panama.
3. Classic spoof on the IPP: Sir, a plan, a canal -- Paris
4. Classic spoof on the IPP: A dog, a plan, a canal -- pagoda
5. Classic spoof on the IPP: Amen, a pit -- Ipanema.
6. Novel concoction: One man, a plan, a canal -- panameño
7. Novel concoctionA girl, a plan, a canal, pal -- Riga.
8. Novel concoction: A man, a Pan -- a panama. (hats)
9. Novel concoction: A man, a plan, if final -- Panama. 





















































If you want to resume daily titillations on our blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any week in the years 2020 and 2021. (There are now over 600 daily entries on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.)


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