Wednesday 20 January 2021

JAN 20 (2021), TOURISTS' PALINDROMIC GUIDE: The Old World #2



This post represents a followup to the post  - Tourists' Palindromic Guide: The Old World #1
SATIRE COMPOSED: Giorgio Coniglio (registered pseudonym) and Dr GH, 2018. 
WORDPLAY LINK: Geographically focused concoctions are among the many palindromic treasures honored and displayed on this site. Check out the list of entries for "The Palindrome Suite".

SONGLINK: Some readers will be delighted (others will continue to groan) at our collection of songs based on palindromic phrases -- see the slides and hotlinks at the bottom of that initial posting.










Click HERE to continue to panels #13 through #18.


(Or, switch horses, and check out the series of helpful palindromes from the Americas, HERE!)



DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 

To resume daily titillations on our blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2022, there are 1000 entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.)


Friday 15 January 2021

Verse and anagrams: election fraud












After discussing the reshufflings on these maps with my nephew M.H., I am embarrassed to have to admit that I neglected to include the name of the high-profile California performing entity 'If-Loner Duet CA'. Sorry about that oversight!

To review the entries in a recent National Anagram Contest that used the phrase 'ELECTION FRAUD' as the target for letter-scrambles, check this blog-link











If you would like to see the complete 'anagram swarm' based on A VERY STABLE GENIUS, check this post.


You can find more anagram swarms in a follow-up post by clicking here!


If you want to resume daily titillations on our blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any week in the years 2020 and 2021. (There are now over 600 daily entries on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.)


Sunday 10 January 2021

Reversing Verse: Limericks About CLASSIC PALINDROMES, part #2

This post provides a continuation of the wordplay display started in December 5, 2020. In that initial post, the following classic palindromes (phrases or sentences whose letters are ordered identically when they are read backwards as well as forwards) were described and extolled in verse; contents were as follows: 

1. Dennis sinned
2. Drawn onward
3Gnu dung
4. Yreka bakery
5. Lonely Tylenol
6. UFO tofu
7. Too hot to hoot
8. Never odd or even 


CURRENT CONTENTS
Please note that, continuing the convention adopted in the previous post , there will be an exclusive correlation between green italicized font and palindromes. But not all of the palindromes displayed within the verses' lines are in the 'classic repertoire'. Some are recent concoctions by the author.

9. Sex at noon taxes
10. No 'X' in Nixon
11. A Santa at NASA
12. T. Eliot's toilet
13. Madam, I'm Adam
14. Sex of foxes
15. Able ere Elba
16. A Toyota's a Toyota












Some readers might be relieved to note that there is an alternate version of the original palindromic news headline that proclaims, with a more optimistic tone in keeping with the holidays ...
      A Santa deified at NASA.


















Stay tuned for further posts that will bring you poetic discussion of more classic palindromes:

Scheduled for February 5, 2021 ...
17. Mr. Owl ate my metal worm
18. Emil's lime
19. (Critique of palindromes); To idiot: 
20. A dim or fond 'No!' from Ida
21. No lemon, no melon (fruitless)
22. Contrived (saw- and see-lines)
23. Flee to me, remote elf
24. No sir, prison (Roger Stone)


DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
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DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of December 2022, there are over 1000 entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.)

Tuesday 5 January 2021

Verses That Spurt: GEYSERS




SATIRE COMPOSED: Giorgio Coniglio, September 2018. Today's verses have been edited and selected for publication at OEDILF.com, an online humour dictionary that has accumulated over 100,000 carefully edited limericks. Thanks are due to OEDILF contributing-editor MikeAq who kindly provided permission for linking to one of his related verses (please review this extravaganza at the bottom of this post).

SONGLINK: For those readers who like poetry set to music: You can find lots of singable limerick medleys on our sister blog "SILLY SONGS and SATIRE", such as this recent post

By the way, to find more limericks, or any other search target on either of these 2 blogs, use the SEARCH-FUNCTION found at the top of the righthand margin.









Authors' Note:  The geyser (GHIE-zer or GHEE-ser) is an unusual hydrogeologic phenomenon which occurs in volcanic zones where magma (molten lava) is close to the surface, and there is fissuring of rocks due to earthquake faults. Minerals dissolved from adjacent rocks precipitate out, forming a lining for a type of 'plumbing system' in which steam builds up, resulting in regular eruptions of boiling water. Changes in the colour of the swirling hot water in the pool help predict the arrival of the next photogenic discharge. 

 Yellowstone Park, in the American Rockies, is a site of these natural wonders, including the famous geyser ‘Old Faithful’.







Authors' Note: In 1894, the wealthy British distiller, James Craig of Ulster, later Lord Craigavon, purchased from a local Icelandic farmer the land around the iconic geyser, Geysir (or the great Geysir). Fences were erected, and admission charged for a brief period. Several changes in ownership were in fact required, but eventually the site was donated in perpetuity to the Government of Iceland. Lord Craigavon, subsequent to his Icelandic adventures, became the first prime minister of Northern Ireland.
 The geyser spout itself, apart from a single event in the 1930s, has remained dormant since 1916, although adjacent spouts have taken over the fanfare.



Authors' NoteBjörg(f.) and Björn(m.) are typical Icelandic names. In Britain, the term geyser, has come to mean a secondary water heater at the point-of-use, e.g. a bathtub. In Iceland, hot water is distributed to all homes as a part of geothermal energy systems; devices to rewarm water at the point of use are not needed, and probably not available.
In North America, such auxiliary plumbing devices are known as ‘tankless water heaters’
Björn originally conceived of his gift idea based on occasional offerings of spent hydrogeologic geysers in Icelandic second-hand stores, e.g. the original reliable vent at Geysir which thrilled Victorian tourists has died back, 'replaced' nearby by other vents. The reader is left to judge whether such second-hand devices represent a figment of the author’s imagination or contrived nonsense. 
    





Man-made geyser-like phenomenon
(broken water-main, Mt. Pleasant, S.C.)