Friday 15 March 2024

Poetic NON-SEQUITURS #3


 This blogpost is a continuation of material developed for prior blog-posts, each grouping a collection of verses, entitled "Poetic NON-SEQUITURS #1" and "Poetic NON-SEQUITURS #2". 


previous posted poems (#1)
almost kosher
autophagia
bush plane
charity auction
close quarters
cumulative songs
demolition
dishwasher

previous posted poems (#2)
doggy bag
epistaxis
ESL (W-I-P)
far-flung family
gavel (judge's)
gifted children
having the audacity
hoggishly


CURRENT CONTENTS:
Horticultural
Host and co-host
Hoyle, Edmond
Latitude (changes in)
Obstruction of justice
Old prospector
Professor and Madman
Secret life of plants
Victims of bullying


Author's Note: 

arrangement of florists: proposed collective noun for this occupational grouping.






Authors' Note: 

according to Hoyle: an idiom alluding to Edmond Hoyle's books as the ultimate authority on the rules of social games, particularly cardgames such as whist

There are few verifiable details of the early life of Edmond Hoyle (1672–1769). As a tutor in parlour games, he published A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist at the age of 70. Other books of rules followed, primarily involving card games, but also chess and probability theory. Hoyle died at age 97 in London, England, prior to the popularization of today's most common games such as poker and contract bridge. 



Authors' Note: The 1977 album Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes by American singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett contained a song of the same title, as well as his most popular hit "Margaritaville".
With holiday season travel plans, and snowbirds' escapes to more appealing climes disrupted by the severe December weather in the winter of 2022, J.B.'s advice has more relevance. And the authors express gratitude to their female partner who has made arrangements for the appropriate seasonal migration.










Authors' Note"The Secret Life of Plants", 1973, was a controversial piece of 'non-fiction' that recounted controversial experiments that pointed to plant sentience and emotion. The book became the basis for a documentary film, and even inspired a music album by a well-known popular singer/musician in 1979. Considerable criticism arose from its then-trendy pseudoscientific claims based on non-replicable reports. Subsequently, aspects of how plants, including vegetable species, sense and react to environmental changes, have undergone more intense and sober investigation by academic botanists.





DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense", click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2023, there are over 1200 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on "Edifying Nonsense" in topic-based collections.) The "Daily" format also has the advantage of including song-lyrics, videos and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.





Sunday 10 March 2024

Poems About Avian Life: BIRDLORE, part #3

 previous poetic posts

(part #1)
American goldfinches
birdfeeders
bird droppings
California scrub-jays
cattle egrets
cedar waxwings
dawn chorus
de-snooding (domestic turkeys)
eagles and eaglets
eastern towhees
house finches
pigeons
red-tailed hawks
red-winged blackbirds
robins
toucans

CURRENT CONTENTS:
Tufted tit(mouse)
Turkey lovers 
Avian digestion (6 verses; a 'brief saga')
Domestic turkeys (3 verses; a 'brief saga')



Authors' Note: The tufted titmouse, Baeolophus bicolor, a small cute bird that inhabits the eastern part of North America is named for the crest of feathers on his head, and for old English words for "little bird". Other species of Baeopholus are found in North America, and there are related genera of songbirds known as "titmice" in Europe. The archaic suffix "-mouse" currently adds little to the description of this perky visitor, so he is often known simply as a "tufted tit".

Check out a brief video (live photo) of the tufted titmouse HERE









(Note that the three verses of this "brief saga" can be found in more readily legible format on the blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense"; click HERE.) 
 




(Note that the six verses of this "brief saga" can be found in more readily legible format on the blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense"; click HERE.) 


(Ed. note) If you enjoyed these illustrated verses about landbirds, you might also want to work your way through our collection of some forty illustrated short poems about waterfowl. Proceed to "Immersible Verse: Limericks about Waterfowl", here on our full-service blog "Edifying Nonsense"

ADDITIONAL PHOTO-COLLAGES: 

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Tuesday 5 March 2024

Progress in Poetry: "LIMERRHOIDS" (C-rhyme extension)

 We're hoping with this blogpost to provide you with more understanding and some helpful examples related to a type of  limerick-variation indulged in by the authors. To see the whole spectrum of our efforts, you might want to take the time to review "A Corner of the Poet's World: LIMERICK VARIATIONS".

Note that "limerrhoid" is a neologism, i.e. a concocted word invented by the authors for an extended limerick verse; it has no genuine medical significance, although it sounds as if it should. And, before you proceed to learn about limerrhoids, you might want to review the simpler concept of extended 7-line limericks that result from the incorporation of "extra" pairs of lines with A-or B-rhymes, usually at the end of the stanza. We do also indulge in these less sophisticated entities, and we have collected them for you; click HERE for "Run-On Limericks".   



Authors' Note: an apocryphal tale. The authors offer their apologies to any extant persons in Ireland or elsewhere named Seamus O'Malley, or their descendants.




The above verse also appears in the blogged collection of  'Poetic Non-Sequiturs', aand at OEDILF #125808. 














The above verse also appears in the blogged collection of verse "Pandemic Poetry", and on OEDILF at #124900.


More Examples

                                The above verse also appears at OEDILF #125802.


This verse, with two 'bonus' rhyming pairs of internal additional short lines represents an internal limerrhoid.  

The above verse also appears in the blogged collection "Patients and their Maladies" and on OEDILF at #123451.

The above verse also appears in the blogged collection of "Poetic Non-Sequiturs", and at OEDILF at #125001.

Further collections of "limerrhoid" verses by the authors, using an extended limerick format, have been compiled for readers; click HERE


DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: To resume daily titillations on our related blog "Daily Illustrated Nonsense", click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of December 2023, there are about 1400 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on "Edifying Nonsense" in topic-based collections.) The 'Daily' format has the advantage of including some videos and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.