Sunday 20 June 2021

Lyrics for Singable Satire: "SOMETHING TO GROAN ABOUT" (tribute to Kim Jong Un)

 PARODY SONG-LYRICS


ORIGINAL SONG: "Something To Sing About" by Oscar Brand, 1963. You can listen to the well-known version by The Travellers on YouTube by clicking here.

PARODY COMPOSED: Dr.G.H. and Giorgio Coniglio, April 2018, in preparation for upcoming Canada Day 2018.

UKULELE and GUITAR-FRIENDLY LINK: All our songs (Giorgio's parody-lyrics and the originals that gave rise to them) can be found, along with suggested chord sequences in a friendly format for ukulele (and guitar)-players on our sister blog "SILLY SONGS and SATIRE". Click here to proceed to that site.  




SOMETHING TO GROAN ABOUT


(to the tune of "Something To Sing About")


I have asked Kim Jong Un, if he please would come visit soon,
Climate up here's 'bout the same as Pyongyang.
There'd be Raptors to watch, as he'd ratchet things up a notch;
And it's close to D.C. He replied, and he sang...

KIM's CHORUS#1: "Your mistake was to shelve war, way back after 1812
(Conflicts North-South helped my clan get ahead).
An armed border zone keeps two entities on their own.
When Yanks ask 'DMZee?', you demand 'DMZed'." 

Great Leader, don't send missiles  to our Queen Charlotte Isles,
Misty mystical place natives call 'Haida Gwai'.
We hope you and Don work things out, no need to rant and shout.
Diplomacy's tough, but please give it a try.

 KIM'S CHORUS#2: "From the wheat on your Prairies to the cheese from your dairies,
Metal tariffs in place on U.S. border fence.
You should follow our music score, as played in Singapore.
Hide heavy weapons, cozy up to Trump-Pence."

Kim, don't plant any nuke on, our territory called the Yukon.
The soil there's quite poor --  permafrost, rocks and scree.
It's too cold to grow a cuke on; you'll need to keep your tuque on

When you visit with Dennis. Bring extra kimchee.

KIM's CHORUS#1 (reprise): "Your mistake was to shelve war, way back after 1812
(Conflicts North-South helped my clan get ahead).
An armed border zone keeps two entities on their own.
When Yanks ask for 'DMZee', just demand 'DMZed'."  





If you want to resume daily titillations on our blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE







Tuesday 15 June 2021

MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE, part #1


CURRENT CONTENTS:
Angwantibo
Bats
Beaver
Buffalo
California sea lion
Coyotes (plastic)
Cretan goat (kri-kri)
Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla)
(for continuation, see the link below)



Authors' Note:  The angwantibo (an-GWAN-tee-boh) or golden potto, Calabar angwantibo, is a small golden-haired primate inhabiting parts of Central Africa, including the country of Gabon. It undertakes its propagation rituals while hanging from the branches of trees. The results of attempts at such matings by unskilled participants are unrecorded.

  To some readers the name Geebo may seem unlikely, but the author assures you that for the first twenty years of his life this nickname (one of the few of which he approved) was in common use, at least by his siblings; it is still used occasionally in close circles.



Authors' NoteBATS, the flying mammals, are found in many idioms, which mostly give them unfavorable press, including:
batty,
old bat,
to have bats in the belfry,
(take off) like a bat out of hell,
as blind as a bat.













Authors' Note:  The California sea lion, Zalophus californianus, native of the west coast of North America, has increased in population considerably in recent years.  The marine mammal is sexually dimorphic, with males larger in size and having more commanding vocal abilities than the females. Both genders are larger and more socially active than the true 'earless' seals, which can move on land only by scooting on their bellies.

 Sea lions are highly intelligent, and positioning their front flippers, they can support themselves in a 'four-legged' walk; their ability to learn and perform tricks has given them a role as the (misnamed) 'circus seal'.









Follow-up note: As is often the case, e.g. with bears or raccoons, feeding wild animals can result in untoward behaviour. On our subsequent two-week visit to California in early April 2022, we saw no such disreputable behavior by sea lions (but it must be admitted that we saw no sea lions, although we certainly heard them barking, particularly around the piers at Monterey). 
















Requests from many armchair naturalists, and career zoologic scientists have come to fruition; there is now a followup post continuing this theme that you can easily access by clicking HERE




To resume daily titillations on our blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2022, there are 1000 entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.)


Thursday 10 June 2021

Poems about Avian Life: BIRDLORE, part#1


CURRENT CONTENTS: 
American goldfinches
Birdfeeder (squirrel-proof)
Bird droppings
California scrub-jays
Cattle egrets
Cedar waxwings
Dawn chorus
De-snooding (domestic turkeys)
Eagles and eaglets
(for continuation, see the link below)



Authors' Note:  This common North American bird species, Spinus tristis, is often referred to as the "wild canary" owing to the male's bright yellow summer coat, set off by black wings with white ribbons and black forehead patch. As their diet consists almost entirely of seeds, nesting does not begin until mid-or late summer when weed seeds become plentiful. Thistle heads are used not only to feed the young, but also to construct the nest! The relative dietary habits of finches around the globe (insects versus seeds) has been an area of intense biologic study (see the verse "Darwin's finches” at OEDILF.com). 
The less intensely costumed female can be seen in a brief video on our daily blog HERE.






Authors' Note: Although its use appears cute, the term bird-turd displays your ignorance. The appropriate expression is pronounced as BEHRD drahp-ing in usual discussions.









Authors' Note: The cattle egret is a wading bird most closely related to the herons of Ardea species, but is also a cousin of the common egret and snowy egret. Unlike the latter birds, it may breed in drier areas further inland, and consume terrestrial insects as a substantial portion of its diet. Recently documented changes in its range include expansion to much of the United States, South America, southern Africa and Australia. In general, the bird's enlarged domain has followed that of domesticated grazing mammals.

As bovine may have the meaning of 'dull' or 'stolid', the author was delighted to ascribe more emotional responses to these beasts.











Authors' Note: 

 mohel (mo-HAYL, a more Hebraic pronunciation), or
 moyel (MOY-uhl, more Yiddish-influenced)   
 The current verse can be read employing either pronunciation.












(Ed. note) If you enjoyed these illustrated verses, you might also want to work your way through our collection of over thirty illustrated short poems about waterfowl. Proceed to 'Immersible Verse: Limericks about Waterfowl' on this full-service blog, 'Edifying Nonsense'. 


Bird-watchers, academic ornithologists, wordplay enthusiasts, wildlife photographers, Giorgio's relatives, and just everyday folks have united in their demand for more verses on the topic of landbirds!
So, please follow this link! for 'birdlore, part#2' 


DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our related blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2023, there are over 1200 unique entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.) The 'Daily' format also has the advantage of including some videos and other material that are not shown here on this topic-based blog.


Saturday 5 June 2021

American Satire: A TERM OF ENDIREMENT #3

This post provides a follow-up to ...
"AMERICAN SATIRE (A Term of Endirement) #1"(Note that this first collection of poems gives helpful suggestions on how to SING these intriguing lyrics.)
and "AMERICAN SATIRE (A Term of Endirement) #2"



Authors' Note

sillery: neologism for 'silly tomfoolery'






Authors' Note:   “Sheriff Joe" Arpaio, a former official of Maricopa County, Arizona, had a long flamboyant career characterized by legal actions against colleagues, heavy-handed treatment of suspects and prisoners, and allegations of massive misuse of funds. The ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) eventually brought suit against him for civil rights violations, and after refusing to comply, he was finally convicted of contempt of court.
 
   As an octogenarian, Arpaio had become a political friend and outspoken advocate of Donald Trump, who pardoned his criminal offence in August 2017, prior to the imposition of a sentence.









Author's Note:  The verse imagines an advisor or supporter picking up on an assertion by the contentious 45th US president. The latter had remained steadfast in demanding budgeting for a southern border wall with Mexico (putatively to decrease the unregulated influx of refugees), and was prepared to take the credit/blame for the pending global shutdown of government financing should it occur.
A venous cutdown is a maneuver to provide reliable access for fluids and drugs during a medical emergency. 









Authors' Note:  In August, 2020, “It is what it is” became a key U.S. presidential comment on deaths due to the coronavirus that were downplayed in the rush to 'reopen' the country. Subsequently, various explanations for the excess were squirmingly offered by the Executive branch of the U.S. government. It was purported, for example, that some doctors were rewarded by their hospitals for inflating the number of death certificates indicating COVID-19 as the apparent cause of death.





American politics; Mitt Romney; Donald Trump; taxonomy; great egret

Authors' NoteReaders might want to check out prior posts, including that of Feb 9, entitled "Anagrammatic tribute to a Senator", and those of January 1910 and 11, dealing with great egrets. The photos of birds were obtained from Giorgio Coniglio's personal collection, whereas those of political leaders were obtained from readily available online sources.


FOLLOW-UP

Owing to intense demand for more verses of this type, we have worked hard to accommodate your wishes; in fact there are now six such collections! So, you can view another collection of these philosophically-charged limericks by clicking this link !


DIRECTION FOR WEB-TRAVELLERS: 
To resume daily titillations on our blog 'Daily Illustrated Nonsense', click HERE. Once you arrive, you can select your time frame of interest from the calendar-based listings in the righthand margin, and check the daily offerings for any month in the years 2020 to the present. (As of September 2022, there are 1000 entries available on the Daily blog, and most of these are also presented here on 'Edifying Nonsense' in topic-based collections.)